Fred Emory Smith

Fred Emory Smith.jpg

Music is an essential part of cinema. It changes, manipulates and enhances the emotion and direction of any given filmic piece. This incredible ability to capture and convey the unwritten drama is the inspiration to which Fred has devoted his talent and practice.

Fred received his bachelor’s degree in Film Scoring from Berklee College of Music. For his contributions and talent while at Berklee, Fred was honored to receive the Doug Timm Award for outstanding musicianship in Film Scoring. For his commencement ceremony, Fred conducted renowned film composer Howard Shore's award-winning suite to the Martin Scorsese film “The Aviator", after being personally coached by Mr. Howard Shore himself.

Upon transitioning to Los Angeles, Fred immediately moved to Los Angeles and started his career. He began working for multiple composers, doing midi programming, arranging, score preparation, orchestration and additional writing for various films, TV shows, theme parks and music libraries. During that time, Fred worked closely with fellow composer Adam Zelkind for a number of hit shows from MTV and VH1.

Fred now has a considerable amount of industry experience including working as the film composer on House in The Alley and High School Trap (Bay Cap 3) directed by Kiet Lee. He provided musical arrangements for the video game Need for Speed: The Run and worked as a Drum Loop Arranger on Transformers 3 with Paramount Pictures. Fred also assisted Ryan Shore with musical arrangements to Jackie Evancho’s Heavenly Christmas album as well as various film and video game projects included Spy Hunter by Warner Bros. & The Weinstein Company’s Swimming In Air.

Fred completed the score to the feature film drama 3.50, which was co-directed by Chhay Bora & Eysham Ali. Fred partnered with composer/orchestrator Penka Kouneva, and co-wrote the song Airplane Bound for the Skies for her highly acclaimed instrumental album A Warrior’s Odyssey. Most recently, Fred earned a 2013 Emmy nomination for his work with PBS on P.O.V.

Nick Arocho